Saturday, October 11

New England.

South Dakota to Wisconsin, to Illinois, to Ontario, to Massachusetts to New Hampshire through a myriad of states. Toss in a quick flight to St Louis. I've been racking miles on the Tacoma and waking up in a new spot nearly every morning.

There was some climbing in-between. A few awesome days in Lions Head, Ontario, a handful of days in gyms from Adventure Rock, to Climb So iLL, to Brooklyn Boulders Sumerville. Now I've settled at my main destination; Rumney, New Hampshire. I love it here. New England is every bit as charming and beautiful as I imagined it to be. It seems I made it just in time too. The leaves are exploding with color and the sun has been shining everyday thus far. 

So damn New England. Beautiful evening.
I have wanted to make it up here for a long time, but my post on the US's very best 5.14s and seeing Rumney repeatedly named solidified my desire to make a trip. It's a ways out of the usual circuit for me, but after 4 climbing days here I'm so so glad that I make the trek, and I'm really looking forward to more and more climbing at one of America's raddest destinations. Not to mention just being in this part of the world- America is so diverse and every little piece of this enormous country has such a distinct flavor. It's cool, and different, to be here. 

Before I made it this far though, I linked up with a good buddy of mine, Mike Williams up on the Bruce Peninsula in Ontario for a few days of climbing at Eastern Canada's prize crag, Lions Head. It was a rad little trip in and of itself. I wrote about it, and my experience of the tucked away spot on the Arcteryx Bird Blog which can be read here. Definitely click and read! 









Rumney reminds me so so much of a little off the road crag in Clear Creek, Colorado called the Primo Wall. The style, the rock, the length and the movement is very similar. Rumney is short and powerful. Routes are tricky, often times blocky features create cryptic movement with drop knees, knee bars, strange holds and compression. There is also plenty of straight forward hold grabbing and pulling. The rock is of the highest quality, and many lines truly stand out and inspire. Rumney is by all means my anti-style. I had and still have very few expectations at a venue like this. It suits a boulderer very well... I'm not much of a boulderer. But I stopped off in Boston for a few days of bouldering indoors and I think it really helped. 


I've been warming up to the area, in the hopes of tackling some of the gnarly hard stuff here before the season closes down. I've had some luck so far, most notably on 'Parallel Universe' 14a, 'Cold War' 14a and to my surprise 'Livin Astro' 14c. I tried this truly striking pitch once on Thursday in near perfect conditions. Each crux is pretty subtle, so I took my time figuring it out. Especially the finishing crux, which requires a full on wild Jackie Chan jump kick if you're not tall enough to keep your foot on. This was a strange one to suss out, but I found a method that worked pretty damn well. Next try I struggled to remember all of the beta as I made my way to the final crux and stuck the jump. It's hard for me to believe that this route is really 14c, but that seems to be the consensus after many repeats so I suppose I got lucky? I'm hoping this means I've got a shot at taking down it's neighbor... Mike Williams took video of the whole thing, which will be live on DPM here soon I imagine. 



The last couple days I've done some great 5.13s like Butt Bongo Fiesta, Coral Sea, Rhythm X, Concrete Jungle, Cote D'Azure and more. Rumney is a really fun crag to just move around sampling and climbing pitches because they tend to be short, relatively uninvolved and the density is huge. It's easy to get in 8-10 pitches a day here. But it also wears on you. My shoulders are wrecked!

"How they washed their hands back in the olden days..."

Thursday, September 18

WY, SD and Eastward

Trying out a new style of post. More photos, fewer words. Tell me how you like it. I'm on a brief stop over, visiting friends and family in the Milwaukee and Chicago areas on my way towards Ontario... Hope you enjoy my images from the last 10 days in Wyoming and South Dakota.

Jackson is still one of my favorite places anywhere, and the fall there is exceptionally beautiful. I ripped through there for an afternoon on my way from Idaho to Lander. 
Wolf Point. A pretty surreal place. It was awesome to return.
Rob Phares on 'The Beholder' 13a
Tilden lowers off his new 13c link up, 'House of Hell'. I was primarily back at Wolf to attempt a pretty incredible project there that opened up more recently. It turned out that the crux was a little too physical for my still recovering injury. It will have to wait until next spring I think... trying to be smart about it. In the meantime I stayed stoked for a few days, cleaning up 'Romulus' 13c 'The Wolfsquatch' 13c, 'Full Moon' 13b, 'House of Bricks' 13b, 'House of Hell' 13c, 'Bebolder' 13b and Kyle Vasso's amazing 'Big Bad Wolf' 14a. All rad routes. 
'House of Sticks' 12d/13a
house.
Victoria Canyon, South Dakota is a stunning little zone. Just 20 min outside of Rapid City, it's a small crag but packs an unprecedented quality of climbing. The rock is phenomenal, and after 2 volume days I left with a smile ear-to-ear. Every route I did, save one, were outstanding. 
Robin Maslowski on 'Mogo Chaji', one of the best 12a's anywhere. I went for pure volume while there. Some of my favorites were: 'Steep and Cheap' 13a 'Ninja Please' 13b, 'Ho Chi Minh Rail' 13b, 'Bluce Lee' 12c, 'Map of Japan' 12b, 'Girivic' 13c, 'Thin Red Line' 13b/c, 'Huck Norris' 13a, 'Secret Asian Man' 13a, 'Me So Horny' 12c, 'Cream of Sumyunguy' 13c and 'Foot Fist Way' 13a. Honestly, I was blown away by how rad it is... just too small.. 

On my way towards the unknown... So stoked to be climbing in Ontario and the American North East for the remainder of the year... new-to-me crags are so much fun. It's a treat that I rarely get to indulge in as of late. Stoke is very high. 

Monday, September 8

ten days in Idaho

Most of my time out here is spent alone. I consider myself a very social person. Spending time with my friends and family is hugely important and satisfying to me. That being said, I feel comfortable alone. Something that I've always partially attributed to growing up an only child, but also I think that the last 3 years of constant travel and road life has strengthened this quality.



Being at the Fins, in Eastern Idaho, invokes a pretty special feeling of loneliness. I often refer to the zone simply as; the expanse. There's no doubt that the Fins is gaining popularity, as it should, but during mid week you can still wake up to utter stillness. Enormous sky. A vantage that begs for gazing. It really came home, how special this area is - even after several years of time spent here - I see now more than ever how incredible of a crag it is.






Somewhat to my surprise I managed to have a really rewarding and fruitful campaign at the Fins this year. I remember leaving last season with the general thought that, mostly the best climbing was bolted and that a few B-grade lines may still exist. I did have a few things swirling in my head that were worthy of a trip back however, and thankfully my stoke drew me into a handful of new, hard, impressive routes. Every day that I wasn't climbing I was bolting or cleaning or exploring... or resting I suppose, but hardly. I'm so grateful for all the friends who came out, and once again for the Idaho climbing community for hosting me in such a rad way. I added 5 new routes this year:

'Mind Your Manors' emerged on the Solstice wall, up hill from the banner Discovery sector. The crux is engaging and really 5 bolts long. It's a series of reachy moves between edges. At times it feels impossibly thin. The movement is consistent and dynamic on a slightly overhanging wall. It's truly an outstanding route and one that is quite unique at this venue. Power-endurance dynamic crimping. I suggest low 14b for it.

IAN CAVANAUGH IMAGE

'A Date with She-Ra' is the Discovery Wall extension to a Peter Heeken original 12+ named 'Skeletor'. The extension adds a couple bolts of sustained hard 5.12 climbing, including the second crux of 'Bushido' 13a, and then without pause fires into a very tenuous, balancy crux between super shallow pockets and features a heinous textured pinch that is just enough to hold you over your feet. Non other than Peter Heeken was there to belay my send. 14a.

'Year of the Ox' is the main challenge that brought me back to the Fins. I had spied a series of limestone cracks that neighbors my 2012 route 'Enter the Dragon'. The Ox is a climb much in the same vein. Three bolts lead through some 5.13- climbing down low and then for another 80 or 90 feet the pitch is all gear. A few shallow, somewhat questionable purple TCUs guard a long run out and a certain ground fall at mid-hieght, which I thought warrants an 'R'. Although this climbing is quite easy comparatively. The 3 different cruxes are all unique. The finishing crux is a long run-out to the chains with big, insecure moves on rounded feet. It's really an outstanding climb, and one that I'm particularly proud of, along with it's neighbor, the Dragon. I rappelled and cleaned it on my birthday. 13d R.

IAN CAVANAUGH IMAGEs
'The Antidote' is a huge extension that tops out the massive Yellowcake Wall down the hill from the Discovery zone. Off the anchor of 'Separation of Church of Skate' you first climb through a tricky slight corner until you reach the first crux moving through a series of beautiful 1 and 2 finger pockets to a decent rest. The final, committing crux moves through amazing underclings and smeary feet, with mega exposure near the top of the tower. It's around 38 meters and also 13d.

'Off To Be the Wizard' was my final endeavor. It more than doubles the length of a rad and popular 13c that I bottled last year called 'Yellow Brick Road'. Above the first anchor is excellent compression climbing and insecure footwork. Some tiny edges and slopers lead to a good left hand pocket below a wild crux. A full-on left hand pinky mono and a horrible gaston sloping crimp is all you get to lunge your body sideways and into a sinker one hand pocket jug. It's one of the craziest single moves I've ever done in my climbing and took me dozens of efforts to put together. From here a series of dull rails offer horrible feet with holds well spaced out to a left-ward gaston red-point crux and a juggy ending. I sent on what was my last attempt of my last day with a great crew cheering my efforts, pinky sore as hell. I had only stuck the crux lunge twice from the dog. It was a serious treat to finish it. 14c.

Yes. Another memorable year out in Idaho. Many good people from Salt Lake, Ketchum, Eastern Idaho and Jackson were there throughout to share in the sending and good times. I'm really really pleased with my new routes there. And now... onward to another one of my favorites... Wolf Point.


best of luck to everyone out there.... autumn is knocking..... !